Combodia Fights the Bird Flu virus

Here are three video news bulletins from the Apsara News Cambodia, telling us about the efforts of the Government of Cambodia, Border authorities, in their fight against the H5N1 virus.
Interesting.
 Video 1. 
Video 2.
Video 3.
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Bidflu NewsFlashes Dec 10, 2007

Bidflu NewsFlashes Dec 10, 2007

New outbreak of avian flu

Poland has announced the fourth outbreak of avian flu, this time in the central region of the country. Polish veterinary officials are in the midst of culling over one hundred thousand chickens.

H5N1 has hit the heart of Poland’s poultry region. 52 large farms and several hundred smaller ones are located in the danger zone Police  have cordoned off a three kilometer area in central Poland. They have been sparing no expense  to contain the fourth outbreak of avian flu.

Full article:

http://www.polskieradio.pl/zagranica/news/artykul71453_New_outbreak_of_avian_flu.html 

WHO – Avian Influenza – situation in China – Update 5

The Ministry of Health in China has reported a new case of human infection with the H5N1 avian influenza virus in Jiangsu Province. The case was confirmed by the national laboratory on 6 December. The 52-year old male is the father of the 24-year old man who died from H5N1 infection on 2 December 2007. He is one of the close contacts placed under medical observation by national authorities. He developed symptoms on 3 December and was sent immediately to hospital for treatment. Of the 27 cases confirmed to date in China, 17 have been fatal.

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2007_12_09/en/

The Chinese Ministry ‘not optimistic’ about bird flu prevention!

It seems that the Chinese have finally decided to admit that:

A. There IS a big H5N1 problem in China

B. The Chinese authourities are not able to control it.

Here is the full article from China Daily:

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2007-12/11/content_6311044.htm

Nigeria: Bird Flu – Health Workers Fumigate Poultry Markets Ahead of Festivals

Ahead of the Eid-el Kabir and Yuletide celebrations which are characterized by increase in poultry consumption, officials of the National Avian Influenza Control programme in Yobe State have begun the fumigation of poultry markets, stores and cages with the aim of reducing the chances of spreading avian influenza virus and associated diseases.

Here is the link:

http://allafrica.com/stories/200712100918.html

It was Not Human to Human H5N1 after all. Phew……

The Chinese Officials have confirmed that the bird flu virus that killed a man and infected his father in Jiangsu Province was a “poultry-originated virus” and cannot spread from person to person, Mao Qun’an, spokesman of the Ministry of Health, said in a press conference this morning.

The H5N1 virus has not mutated according to the gene analysis of the virus, Mao said. The cause for the two infections was still being investigated, as both had no contact with poultry before becoming ill.

Mao Qun’an, spokesman of the Ministry of HealthNo clinical symptoms of bird flu have been found among the 83 people who have had close contact with the two patients, the ministry confirmed.Sixty-nine people were in close contact with the first patient, and only his father has shown symptoms of bird flu. Six people who had close contact with both patients are still under close observation while 55 others have been released.

Here is the News Item from the official Chinese Site:

http://www.china.org.cn/english/health/234990.htm

A revalutionary new tool aginst the Bird Flu Virus.

Researcher tests water for evidence of bird flu

I believe that Todd M. Lickfett, a CMU graduate assistant has come up with a truly new idea in the fight against the Bird-Flu virus.

Like all good ideas, it is a simple one.

Lickfett believes he can greatly widen the scope of testing for a virus, by sampling the water where the birds congregate during migratory stopovers, instead of testing samples of the blood of individual birds!

Imagine 10,000 gulls in a pool of water, Lickfett said. The one gull you test might or might not have the virus. But if even one infected gull is in the pool, Lickfett theorizes, a sample of the contaminated water should detect it.

“Basically, it means you’ve effectively sampled all 10,000 birds in one swoop,” he said.

Similar research under way in Asia involves drinking water supplies of commercial poultry.

To test his wild bird method, Lickfett will collect water samples from sites including the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge in Saginaw County.

Lab tests have indicated bird flu viruses can live hundreds of days at cold temperatures. Lickfett hopes to show he can reliably detect it at migration sites, even long after the flocks have left.

If so, his method could test for the deadly bird flu strain.

http://blog.mlive.com/chronicle/2007/12/researcher_tests_water_for_evi.html

It was Not Human to Human H5N1 after all. Phew……

The Chinese Officials have confirmed that the bird flu virus that killed a man and infected his father in Jiangsu Province was a “poultry-originated virus” and cannot spread from person to person, Mao Qun’an, spokesman of the Ministry of Health, said in a press conference this morning.

The H5N1 virus has not mutated according to the gene analysis of the virus, Mao said. The cause for the two infections was still being investigated, as both had no contact with poultry before becoming ill.

Mao Qun’an, spokesman of the Chineswe Ministry of Health

No clinical symptoms of bird flu have been found among the 83 people who have had close contact with the two patients, the ministry confirmed.

Sixty-nine people were in close contact with the first patient, and only his father has shown symptoms of bird flu. Six people who had close contact with both patients are still under close observation while 55 others have been released.

Here is the News Item from the official Chinese Site:

http://www.china.org.cn/english/health/234990.htm

Revalutionary new tool aginst the Bird Flu Virus.

A revalutionary new tool aginst the Bird Flu Virus.

Researcher tests water for evidence of bird flu

I believe that Todd M. Lickfett, a CMU graduate assistant has come up with a truly new idea in the fight against the Bird-Flu virus.

Like all good ideas, it is a simple one.

Lickfett believes he can greatly widen the scope of testing for a virus, by sampling the water where the birds congregate during migratory stopovers, instead of testing samples of the blood of individual birds!

Imagine 10,000 gulls in a pool of water, Lickfett said. The one gull you test might or might not have the virus. But if even one infected gull is in the pool, Lickfett theorizes, a sample of the contaminated water should detect it.

“Basically, it means you’ve effectively sampled all 10,000 birds in one swoop,” he said.

Similar research under way in Asia involves drinking water supplies of commercial poultry.

To test his wild bird method, Lickfett will collect water samples from sites including the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge in Saginaw County.

Lab tests have indicated bird flu viruses can live hundreds of days at cold temperatures. Lickfett hopes to show he can reliably detect it at migration sites, even long after the flocks have left.

If so, his method could test for the deadly bird flu strain.

Way To Go Lickfett !

Sources:

http://blog.mlive.com/chronicle/2007/12/researcher_tests_water_for_evi.html

www.birdflubreakingnews.com

British are Counting Their Chickens

The British Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has organised a poultry census.

The census is being carried out within the 10km surveillance area set up around Redgrave Park Farm – where the highly-pathogenic H5N1 strain of bird flu was confirmed earlier this week – to establish exactly how many birds were there.

AN army of volunteers has visited more than 3,000 homes within the bird flu surveillance zone in a bid to prevent the virus spreading.

Defra’s regional operations director Heather Peck said: “We are still in what the chief veterinary officer has called a period of uncertainty.”

She said council workers had volunteered to help carry out this work and to give advice to residents on what to look out for.
Speaking to the EADT on a visit to the region, East of England minister Barbara Follett praised farmers for the way they had dealt with the current bird flu outbreak and the bluetongue cases earlier this year, as well as those now leading efforts to contain avian influenza.“This is a really professional operation. What is so impressive is seeing so many different agencies working with the owners of poultry,” she said.“There is no sense of frantic activity but a great deal of care being taken regarding public safety.

Defra has traced every movement on and off Redgrave Park Farm, including checking feed lorries, waste trucks, straw trucks and rodent control workers.

Poultry at Grove Farm, Botesdale, was slaughtered on suspicion of having the virus after dozens of birds were found dead by officials. But tests on 30 birds showed they did not have the virus.

Redgrave Poultry’s operations director Geoffrey Buchanan said no evidence of bird flu had been found at three other sites operated by the company in the wider restricted area where precautionary culls are underway.

All four premises share staff with Redgrave Park, and were being culled because of fears they had been exposed to the virus through workers.

Mr Buchanan said Defra began culling birds at Hill Meadow Farm, Knettishall, Suffolk, yesterday and would be starting culls at Stone House, West Harling, Norfolk, and Bridge Farm, Pulham Market, Norfolk, last night.

Sources:

http://www.eveningstar.co.uk/content/eveningstar/news/story.aspx?brand=ESTOnline&category=News&tBrand=ESTOnline&tCategory=News&itemid=IPED17%20Nov%202007%2007%3A59%3A51%3A527 www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/…www.birdflubreakingnews.com


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Bird-Flu follows the Super Cyclone in to Bangladesh

A powerful cyclone has hit the coast of Bangladesh, with winds reported to be up to 240 kilometres (155 miles) per hour.

Cyclones are not new to Bangladesh and the authorities face a huge task if they are to prevent a major loss of life.

 

Bangladesh is one of the most densely populated countries in the world: nearly all the country is low lying and vulnerable to flooding.

An estimated 10 million people live in Bangladesh’s coastal areas and there is simply not enough room for all of them in the country’s 500 or more shelters.

If that was not enough, Avian flu has re-emerged in Bangladesh after four months, with five reported new outbreaks in poultry farms across the country since October.

The contagious viral disease was first detected in Bangladesh in March 2007. Since then there have been 55 outbreaks in 19 of the country’s 64 districts.

To halt a further spread of the virus, more than 250,000 chickens have been culled since the original outbreak.

“But indirect losses to farmers far surpass the direct loss,” veterinarian Abul Kalam Azad of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) told IRIN in Dhaka, the capital.

Many farms have downsized operations, resulting in significant layoffs and the suspension of business, while producers of poultry feed and farm equipment have also been hard hit.

“The whole US$2 billion industry is in a very nervous state,” Azad explained.

A fresh influx of migratory birds is raising further concerns. Hundreds of thousands of Siberian water fowl arrive in Bangladesh from mid-November, taking refuge in the country’s vast rivers, lakes and marshlands.

“The winter months are likely to see more outbreaks,” ASM Alamgir, a virologist at the Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research, warned.

Risk factors “At 795 persons per square kilometre, Bangladesh has the highest population density in the world.

This close proximity of human beings is a risk element for transmission of any contagious disease like flu,” Nazrul Haq, a member of the government’s technical working group on avian influenza risk, said, adding that the hot and humid environment helps pathogens spread quickly. Further compounding the problem is the prominent role of poultry farming.

Almost all rural households keep chickens as a source of cheap protein, with about 2.4 million rural women depending on backyard chicken farming as their only source of livelihood.

Even well-off families in Bangladesh raise a few chickens to supplement their income. As a result, communicating appropriate bio-security practices such as separating domestic flocks from wild ones, hygienic slaughtering and waste disposal, use of masks while cleaning chicken coops, disinfection before and after working in poultry farms, as well as the use of personal protective equipment is already proving difficult

Sources:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7096561.stm

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/IRIN/2b7c451a508fea8f8a09f9a55cd36b40.htm

www.birdflubreakingnews.com

Brit Bird Flu is the Virulent H5N1 Strain

The Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has just announced that the strain of avian flu found in turkeys on a Suffolk farm is the dreaded H5N1.

Acting Chief Veterinary Officer Fred Landeg made the announcement at a press conference in London. All birds at the affected premises – including approximately 5,000 turkeys, 1,000 ducks and 500 geese – will be slaughtered.

A large number of British Police officers are at the entrance to the farm, and vehicles are being sprayed with a jet hose.

The DEFRA official while making the announcement said that the lineage of the virus found on the Suffolk farm is similar to the the dreaded H5N1 found in domestic hens in the Czech Republic in July, and in both domestic poultry and wild birds in Germany earlier this year.

He said that even though the migrating wild birds do visit the lake nearby, he could not be sure that the wild birds are the source of the virus at the free range poultry farm. 

Significantly, the infamous Barnard Matthews Turkey Factory Farm is also only 20 miles away from the Suffolk farm where the current outbreak of the virus has been found. 

 Map of affected farm

It was confirmed yesterday that the birds had the H5 strain of the disease. There are 5,000 turkeys, plus 1,500 duck and geese on the farm, near Diss, on the Norfolk-Suffolk border.

The birds, which are by owned by Gressingham Foods, will all be slaughtered.

Overnight 10 per cent of turkeys in one of the farm’s sheds died showing a higher than “normal mortality rate”.