Trains and Boats and Planes, will bring Bird-Flu…directly to you

Trains and boats and planes are passing by …

The trains and the boats and planes will bring Bird-Flu….

Will bring Bird-Flu… Bring it directly to you….

Let me take you back in time. Back to the year 1918.Life moved at a much more leisurely pace back then.

The fastest way to travel across the Atlantic was with an airship travelling at a bone shaking tens of miles an hour.

Using an ocean liner, It could take weeks to travel from China to Europe or to the US.

The world was really separated by the oceans then and the Americas, Australia, New Zealand etc were in reality cut off from the main mass of humanity on the great Eurasian Continent.

1918 Spanish Flu

The total human population on the planet at the time was a fraction of what it is today and the big Cities were not as congested as they are now.

It was very difficult for an infectious disease to spread across the globe in such conditions.

Never the less, the Pandemic Flu of 1918, DID manage to spread all over the world in an amazingly short period of time.

In doing so, it killed over 40 Million people from all parts of the world.

Yes, the returning soldiers from the Great War did help carry the deadly virus back to their homes.

Even so, it could not have been easy for the killer virus to reach every nook and corner of the globe as it did at that time.

Things are a lot different now!

The world is a much, much smaller place and you can travel across the Continents in a matter of hours.

The concentration of vast number of people in overpopulated cities is the modern witches brew for all kinds of deadly viruses.

The increasingly fast modes of travel, the trains and boats and planes, are the ideal distribution network for these messengers of death.

It is estimated that a highly infectious, airborne virus such as a Pandemic Super Flu, could spread all over the world withing 48 hours of an outbreak in any one country!

That is NOT to say that a Pandemic will happen soon,  or even in our life time.

 IF IT DOES though, the above provides us with a realistic if frightening scenario that could well follow.

Here is what WHO says about the above:

With an estimated 2.1 billion airline passengers roaming the planet last year alone, infectious diseases are spreading faster than ever before, the U.N. health agency said Thursday. The World Health Organization called on governments to follow its revised regulations for fighting dangerous health crises.

“New diseases are emerging at the historically unprecedented rate of one per year,” WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan said in an introduction to the annual World Health Report.

 Sources:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/22/AR2007082202248_pf.html

www.birdflubreakingnews.com

Advertisements

The Bird-Flu leadership Summit?

There was this Bird-Flu leadership Summit, recently held in America, headed by lots of Industry and Government big shots.

Of course it was by and for only the folks in the good old USA, because as you know, there is nothing of importance out side of here.

Accept that the Bird-Flu virus IS out side of the USA and it is slowly creeping from the East to the West, towards the Americas.

 Photo Kenneth Wong

I wonder if any one who was part of the above mentioned Summit, would let me know if the problem of the H5N1 entrenched in foreign lands was discussed at the Summit.

If so, has any actual action of any kind resulted from the said discussions or is any action planned in the near future?

Bird-Flu Human Cases Map from WHO as of May31st – already out of date!

The latest Bird Flu map from the WHO (dated May31st 2007) is out of date already.

There are new cases of the Bird-Flu popping up almost every other day!

Bird-Flu Outbreak a Tourist Attraction???

Who would have thunk it?

On on the 29th of March 2006, a dead Whooper Swan was found floating in Cellardyke harbour, small village in Fife, Scotland.

Subsequent tests on the blood samples from the wild swan confirmed that the swan had died of the highly pathogenic H5N1 variant strain.

News of the presence of the Bird-Flu virus in the city would be greeted with horror by any city council any where in the world.

Not so in Cellardyke however!  Traditional white houses around the harbour in Cellardyke

It appears that the H5N1 infected swan has created a wave of “horror Tourism” with thousands of visitors flocking over to the very beach on the shore of Cellardyke, where the swan with the Bird-Flu had been found floating lifelessly!!

Cellardyke community councillor Martin Dibley loves the the unaccustomed experience of finding himself and his little village under the world’s spotlight with journalists, photographers and film crews flocking to his village.

Here is the news item from the Edinburgh Evening News:

http://edinburghnews.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=532692007&format=print

Edinburgh Evening News Fri 6 Apr 2007

 Bird flu scare has tourists flocking in

BIRD flu has helped Cellardyke experience a mini-tourism boom.

It is a year today since Britain’s first case of deadly bird flu was confirmed in a dead swan which had washed-up in the harbour slipway.

The normally sedate fishing village in the East Neuk of Fife was thrust under the world’s spotlight with journalists, photographers and film crews – as well as scientists – flocking to the area.

Cellardyke community councillor Martin Dibley said: “People still come along to see where the swan was found and anytime bird flu is on the news we get a mention. But to be honest it has all been quite positive.

“I think it showed the village and the area in a positive light.

“Everyone was saying how nice the area was and how friendly the people are and it has in a bizarre way increased tourism a little bit.

Mr Dibley said that property in the area has been snapped up in the last year.

He added: “It is more to do with people seeing it on the news and thinking ‘what a nice little place that is’.”

New Bird-Flu Research tool from the Imperial College London

A new way of understanding how highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) spreads among farm birds is published today.

The new study, carried out by mathematical modellers from Imperial College London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, focuses on how H7N3, H7N7 and H7N1 strains of the virus were transmitted between different farms in three recent outbreaks.

The study could help analyse the success of different control measures in the event of future outbreaks.

Imperial College London is rated as the world’s ninth best university in the 2006 Times Higher Education Supplement University Rankings, Imperial College London is a science-based institution with a reputation for excellence in teaching and research that attracts 11,500 students and 6,000 staff of the highest international quality. 

Here is a link to the article from the Imperial College London:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_4-4-2007-10-24-53?newsid=9494

Teenage girl from Jakarta is the 93rd Indonesian infected with Bird Flu.

A teenage girl in Indonesia is infected with the deadly bird flu virus, becoming the 93rd confirmed case in the country worst hit by the disease, a health official said Thursday.

The girl who was identified only as R, was transferred from Carolus Hospital in Central Jakarta to Sulianti Saroso bird flu referral hospital on April 2, 2007, said Ningrum, a staff with the Health Ministry, Thursday.

“The laboratory test has confirmed of H5N1 positive,” Ningrum was quoted by Antara news agency as saying.

Here is the news item as reported by the 

 Young girl latest Indonesia bird flu case  05-Apr-2007 | 306 words, 1 images

JAKARTA (AFP) — A teenage girl in Indonesia is infected with the deadly bird flu virus, becoming the 93rd confirmed case in the country worst hit by the disease, a health official said Thursday.

The 15-year-old lives in the country’s sprawling capital, Jakarta, and is in intensive care in one of the city’s hospitals, a spokesperson from Indonesia’s bird flu information centre said.

“Specimens taken from her have tested positive for the H5N1 virus in two tests,” said the official, referring to the deadly strain that has killed 72 people here.

Meanwhile a 29-year-old man died Wednesday in Solo after showing bird flu symptoms, said Refiono, a doctor from the hospital that treated him. Solo lies about 500 kilometres (300 miles) from the capital.

“Results of tests have yet to be completed but the patient’s body is being treated as a bird flu case,” the doctor told AFP, adding the victim had been in contact with infected chickens.

Most human infections have occurred after contact with sick birds. The government has banned the popular practice of keeping poultry in backyards in Jakarta to try and stop the spread of the disease.

The World Health Organisation says the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu has infected 288 people and killed 170 of them, mostly in Southeast Asia, since 2003.

Scientists say multiple strains of the disease originated in southern China and spread elsewhere.

They worry the virus could mutate into a form easily spread among humans, leading to a global pandemic with the potential to kill millions.

The fear stems from the lessons of past influenza pandemics. One in 1918, just after the end of World War I, killed 20 million people worldwide.

© 2007 AFP Copyright © 2003-2006 Agence France Presse. All rights reserved.

New Bird-Flu Research tool from the Imperial College London

A new way of understanding how highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) spreads among farm birds is published today.

The new study, carried out by mathematical modellers from Imperial College London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, focuses on how H7N3, H7N7 and H7N1 strains of the virus were transmitted between different farms in three recent outbreaks.

 

The study could help analyse the success of different control measures in the event of future outbreaks.

Imperial College London was rated as the world’s ninth best university in the 2006. Imperial College London is a science-based institution with a reputation for excellence in teaching and research that attracts 11,500 students and 6,000 staff of the highest international quality. 

Here is a link to the article from the Imperial College London:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_4-4-2007-10-24-53?newsid=9494